News 18, Page 1/1

Apple is planning to release three new iPhone models again this fall, including one with a triple rear camera.

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The SEC and the Commerce Department are investigating Boeing’s relationship with a satellite startup backed by a Chinese government-owned firm, following a WSJ article last month.

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Megyn Kelly has been released from her contract with NBC News less than three months after her morning show was canceled by the network.

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T-Mobile US and AT&T said they would stop feeding individual customers’ real-time locations to data middlemen after a report suggested the sensitive information is easy to pull without users’ consent

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General Motors said its earnings are picking up speed, with added momentum due to come this year from plant closures and job cuts denounced by President Trump.

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Walt Disney CEO Robert Iger saw the value of his total compensation last year surge 81% to $65.6 million.

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Transcripts released by the Federal Reserve on Friday revealed the extent of then-governor Jerome Powell’s concerns about the central bank’s 2013 stimulus program of bond purchases.

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Polish authorities detained and charged a local sales director of Huawei, a Chinese national, with conducting high-level espionage on behalf of China, amid widening global scrutiny of the technology giant.

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Japan encouraged the elderly and women to work and broke a longstanding taboo against immigration, offering lessons for other advanced economies facing similar problems. The country is now enjoying its second-longest economic expansion since World War II.

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Samsung’s foray into the U.S. biologic-drug market is proving tougher than expected, as the South Korean company faces strong resistance from established pharmaceutical companies while doctors and patients are reluctant to switch to biosimilars.

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Carlos Ghosn was hit with new charges by prosecutors who accused him of misreporting his compensation through 2018 and abusing his position at Nissan Motor for personal gain.

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One of Nissan Motor Co.’s top executives, José Muñoz, has resigned, the first shake-up of the Japanese auto maker’s top management since the arrest of former Chairman Carlos Ghosn.

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Tame inflation, low gas prices and rising wages are putting more dollars in the pockets of American workers, a positive sign for consumer spending headed into 2019.

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Ben Bernanke and Janet Yellen—after fighting financial crises and anemic economic growth as Federal Reserve leaders—are turning their attention to a different problem: How women are treated in their own profession.

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Beer makers are sitting on suds while they wait for federal approval on new labels and formulas. “We are trying to drink as much of this paralyzed beer as we can.”

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Brexit & Beyond: British Politics Spins Wheels Over Brexit

To subscribe to the newsletter, please sign up here MUST READS British Politics Spins Wheels Over Brexit: Britain’s ongoing Brexit crisis is turning into Groundhog Day. With just over two months until the U.K. is supposed to leave the European Union, Britain’s raucous parliament has slipped...

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The partial government shutdown could cause the longest stretch of continuous job growth recorded in the U.S. to come to an end this month.

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Strong Economy Can't Save Retailers From Holiday Blues

The strong U.S. economy wasn’t enough to give many mall-based retailers a strong year-end boost, as Macy’s and others posted tepid holiday sales, fueling a selloff in retail stocks.

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